35 Bridge Collapse

On behalf of survivors and those who lost loved ones when the Minneapolis I-35W bridge collapsed into the Mississippi River, Robins Kaplan, LLP obtained a settlement exceeding $40 million with a foreign multinational engineering corporation. The families had sued the engineering company because it negligently failed to properly evaluate the bridge’s structural integrity after it was hired by the State of Minnesota to provide engineering services. Robins Kaplan also recovered a significant confidential sum from the company who placed construction materials on the bridge, the weight of which was comparable to a jumbo jet. Robins Kaplan attorneys played in important role in the establishment of legislation which provided millions of dollars to the victims.

Also, the attorneys recovered from the defendants an additional $1.5 million that they donated for the construction of a memorial honoring those who died and those who survived the collapse.

Read more about Robins Kaplan LLP’s work on the 35W bridge collapse using the links below:
Minneapolis I-35W Bridge Survivors and Those Who Lost Loved Ones Recover More Than $40 Million
URS To Pay $52 Million In 35W Case
Pro Bono Legal Services for Victims of the I-35W Bridge Collapse
Pro Bono Firm of 2010: Robins Kaplan
35W Bridge Memorial Gets $1.5 Million Push
Victims’ Fund Won’t End I-35W Bridge Litigation
URS To Pay $52 Million In 35W Case
Rebuilding Lives
After the Collapse – Personal injury lawyer Chris Messerly tackles the 35W bridge collapse
Chris Messerly and Philip Sieff Honored with National Legal Aid & Defender Association’s Arthur von Briesen Award
Firm Receives National Law Journal’s 2011 Pro Bono Award

 

 

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Patrick Stoneking

“People come to me completely overwhelmed by everything that has happened to them. It is so great to be able to step in, take over, straighten things out, and fight to make things right.”
- Patrick Stoneking